Do employers really want a cover letter

While Millennials' desire to have the best of both worlds--freelance flexibility with full-time stability--may lend to the stereotypical notion of "entitlement" we so often attach to this generation, high-performing, people-centered employers see it differently; a workplace with more freedom and autonomy is strong enough to influence a talented Millennial's future job choice, sometimes more than salary does. By offering flexible working arrangements for good talent, companies are making a business case that will reap financial benefits, where both sides win.

During my discussions with many software professionals regarding these questions, I was struck by the fact that, despite the tremendous technological changes over the past 10-20 years, what employers are looking for in programmers hasn't really changed all that much. While it is obvious that programmers today are using different programming languages, operating systems and other modern technologies, the employers are still basically looking for the same “types” of programmers that they were 10 years ago—for that matter, even 20 years ago.

More than half of people who leave their jobs do so because of their relationship with their boss. Smart companies make certain their managers know how to balance being professional with being human. These are the bosses who celebrate an employee’s success, empathize with those going through hard times, and challenge people, even when it hurts. Bosses who fail to  really  care will always have high turnover rates. It’s impossible to work for someone eight-plus hours a day when they aren’t personally involved and don’t care about anything other than your production yield.

Come prepared. Don’t ask for a part-time gig without knowing exactly what you want. If possible, connect with someone from your company who already works part-time and ask if the arrangement has affected her career trajectory. Find out whether your company keeps part-timers on the list of high-value workers who deserve big assignments and promotions. Remember, too, that part-time can mean anything from 20 to 30 hours a week. The devil’s in the details: How many days each week do you want to be in the office? Will your days be flexible? Will you come into the office during high-stress projects? A grueling commute might argue in favor of fewer but longer workdays, but if your department head wants regular face time, she may prefer to have you in daily, for shorter periods.

Do employers really want a cover letter

do employers really want a cover letter

Come prepared. Don’t ask for a part-time gig without knowing exactly what you want. If possible, connect with someone from your company who already works part-time and ask if the arrangement has affected her career trajectory. Find out whether your company keeps part-timers on the list of high-value workers who deserve big assignments and promotions. Remember, too, that part-time can mean anything from 20 to 30 hours a week. The devil’s in the details: How many days each week do you want to be in the office? Will your days be flexible? Will you come into the office during high-stress projects? A grueling commute might argue in favor of fewer but longer workdays, but if your department head wants regular face time, she may prefer to have you in daily, for shorter periods.

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do employers really want a cover letterdo employers really want a cover letterdo employers really want a cover letterdo employers really want a cover letter