Example of an epigraph in an essay

PYRRHIC : In classical Greek or Latin poetry, this foot consists of two unaccented syllables--the opposite of a spondee . At best, a pyrrhic foot is an unusual aberration in English verse, and most prosodists (including me!) do not accept it as a foot at all because it contains no accented syllable. Normally, the context or prevailing iambs, trochees, or spondees in surrounding lines overwhelms any potential pyrrhic foot, and a speaker reading the foot aloud will tend artificially to stress either the first or last syllable. See meter for more information.

The chief device of ancient Hebrew Biblical poetry , including many of the psalms , was parallelism , a rhetorical structure in which successive lines reflected each other in grammatical structure, sound structure, notional content, or all three. Parallelism lent itself to antiphonal or call-and-response performance, which could also be reinforced by intonation . Thus, Biblical poetry relies much less on metrical feet to create rhythm, but instead creates rhythm based on much larger sound units of lines, phrases and sentences. [40] Some classical poetry forms, such as Venpa of the Tamil language , had rigid grammars (to the point that they could be expressed as a context-free grammar ) which ensured a rhythm. [41] In Chinese poetry , tones as well as stresses create rhythm. Classical Chinese poetics identifies four tones : the level tone, rising tone, departing tone, and entering tone . [42]

Example of an epigraph in an essay

example of an epigraph in an essay

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